Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility
top of page

56 elementos encontrados para ""

  • Immigration Study Citizenship | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Citizenship Key Facts Citizenship Immigrants in Northern Virginia have above average rates of naturalization 2013 to 2017 Period Key Facts: ​ More than half, or 51.3 percent, of all immigrants in the region, have earned their U.S. citizenship. The Northern Virginia U.S. Citizenship rate of immigrants is higher than the national average of 48 percent. Further information about citizenship, from research NVRC has conducted separately from the One Region report, can be found on the People dashboard .

  • Economics Median Household Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Median Household Income Overall Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Median Household Income Overall Northern Virginia is known for having communities with some of the highest median incomes in the United States, including the county with the highest in the nation. High median household incomes coincide with the large, thriving business community of the Northern Virginia region. While the median household income is high, it must be recognized that there are segments of the community in need of assistance that live in this prosperous region of the country and that high housing costs offset the high income when it comes to standards of living and well-being. ​ About the Data and Proper Data Interpretation Median household income data is sourced from the U.S. Census Bureau 2000 Census and the American Community Survey (ACS). ​ It is important to note that any data sourced from the ACS is based on a small sample of the population of a place. Areas with smaller populations, such as the cities of Northern Virginia, may have a larger margin of error in the data due to the survey sample size being small. This is less of an issue the larger the population. The margin of error is shown in the popup that is displayed when hovering over a bar in the bar charts. If there is a large increase or decrease in the estimate from one time period to the next, and the margin of error is large and overlaps other periods, then the large change between time periods is likely due to statistical sampling error and is not considered statistically significant. In addition to the margin of error, the accuracy of the American Community Survey data for an area can be gaged by evaluating the trend. If the data has a clear trend then the data from one period to the next can be deemed reliable. Median Household Income - Current Five-Year Estimates All jurisdictions in the United States are included in the five-year American Community Survey estimates. The Median household income of all jurisdictions in Northern Virginia is shown in this graph. The median household income of every Northern Virginia jurisdiction is higher than the Commonwealth of Virginia and the United States. Out of all 3,144 jurisdictions in the USA, three of the five highest ranked for median household income are located in Northern Virginia, and those include Loudoun County (1st), Falls Church City (2nd), Fairfax County (4th), and Arlington County (10th). Northern Virginia's median household income, at an estimated $140,511 (in 2022 dollars), is higher than 10th ranked Arlington, making Northern Virginia one of the most affluent region's of the USA. Median Household Income - Current ​ One-Year Estimates Those jurisdictions with a population of 65,000 or more are included in the one-year American Community Survey estimates. The median household income of jurisdictions in Northern Virginia with a population of 65,000 or more is shown in this graph. The five largest jurisdictions of Northern Virginia all have incomes higher than the Commonwealth of Virginia and the United States. Out of the 837 jurisdictions with a population of 65,000 or more in the USA, three of the top fifteen highest income jurisdictions are located in Northern Virginia, and those include Loudoun County (1st), Fairfax County (4th), and Arlington County (13th). The median household income of Northern Virginia's five largest jurisdiction together is estimated to be $140,511 (in 2022 dollars), making Northern Virginia one of the most affluent areas of the USA. Median Household Income - Historic Compared to Current Five-Year Estimates The Northern Virginia region's median household income had been rising since 1999 until it stagnated in the 2018-2022 period. The greatest upward transformations in median household income, to levels well beyond inflation, have occurred in the Counties of Arlington and Loudoun. Median Household Income - Historic Compared to Current One-Year Estimates The median household income trend, for the regions large jurisdictions (population of 65,000 or more), are shown in the following graph. Key Facts: There were dips in median household income in the early 2010s for some jurisdictions. The effects of the recession from 2007 to 2009 were still causing economic hardships and in 2013 there was federal sequestration when the federal government made large budget cuts. The Northern Virginia region is heavily dependent on the federal government for its economy, so job layoffs during sequestration impacted household incomes. ​ Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, specifically from 2012 to 2019 the trend in the Northern Virginia median household income was upward after accounting for inflation. The COVID-19 pandemic began in early 2020, setting off a wave of demographic changes in the region and around the nation. Notably, NVRC research has shown that workers retired early but generally remained in the region, immigration slowed, and many young moderate to high-income office workers migrated out of the region to work remotely to places that have a more affordable cost of living. The impact of these shifts is evidenced by Northern Virginia's median household income having a downward trend from 2019 to 2022 after accounting for inflation. Policy makers have given much attention to finding solutions and implementing programs for low-income, but the pandemic has manifested the need for middle-income housing and middle-income programs that will allow current and potential new households to afford to comfortably live and raise families in the region.

  • Immigration Study Education | NOVADashboard | NVRC | Northern Virginia

    Education Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Education Immigrants who settle in Northern Virginia are well educated and bring with them varying levels of work and educational experience 2013 to 2017 Period Key Facts: ​ 20.9 percent of immigrants had an advanced degree, either a master’s, professional or doctoral degree. 44.5 percent of immigrants in Northern Virginia age 25 and older had at least a bachelor’s degree. The proportion of immigrants with a bachelor’s degree or higher in Northern Virginia at 44.5 percent, is much higher than immigrants in the United States at 31.2 percent.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19) Economic Impact | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Economic Impact of Coronavirus Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Unemployment and Labor Force Information on the economic impact and recovery from the coronavirus pandemic in Northern Virginia are found in the Economic Tracking Report. The tracking document includes data and trends on the labor force and unemployment. The report is updated following the monthly release of the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Local Area Unemployment Statistics .​ Economic Tracking Report Click on image for document Latest Version released: April 5, 2024 ​ Updates will occur within 3 business days after the following BLS scheduled release dates: April 3, 2024 (February 2024 data) May 1, 2024 (March 2024 data) May 29, 2024 (April 2024 data) July 3, 2024 (May 2024 data) State of the Region: Economic Recovery and Transformation from COVID-19 Pandemic Information on the state of the Northern Virginia region's economic recovery and the transformation from the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic is found in the State of the Region July 2022 report. As society eases back to normalcy, people have been returning to the labor force, but – despite many people returning to the labor force and new entrants to the Northern Virginia labor force – there are currently not enough workers to meet the labor force demands across various industries in the region. The region’s labor force is significantly down from February 2020, there are a high number of job postings, and there is a low unemployment rate. The economic effect of the COVID-19 pandemic and the economic recovery has been uneven across industries and demographic groups in Northern Virginia. Understanding why the Northern Virginia region’s labor force has declined, why those people in Northern Virginia who left the labor force during the pandemic are not returning in full, and how to overcome a shortage of labor is critical to fostering an economy and community where residents and businesses can thrive. This report provides detailed information on these factors. Click on image for report Minority-Owned Businesses Minority-owned businesses have experienced heightened risk associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a complex effect on the region’s local economy and on the wellbeing of its minority-owned businesses. Northern Virginia is home to 128,000 minority-owned businesses, representing the community’s diverse fabric and entrepreneurship. The report on Supporting Northern Virginia's Minority-Owned Businesses was released on June 23, 2021. The report contains detailed information on the minority-owned business community, how they were impacted by the pandemic, and recommendations for supporting them through the pandemic economic recovery and in the future beyond the pandemic. The Northern Virginia Minority-Owned Working Group present this report. The group is composed of members from the Northern Virginia Regional Commission, the Community Foundation for Northern Virginia, the Fairfax County Economic Development Authority, the Loudoun County Department of Economic Development, the Prince William County Department of Economic Development, Arlington Economic Development, and the Alexandria Economic Development Partnership. ​ A report release webinar event was hosted on June 23, 2021 to highlight the report findings. The event also included other presentations, a fire side chat with leaders from across the region, and testimonies from minority business owners. For the video recording and details on the event see the NVRC demographic webinar series website . ​ Report: The report provides a Northern Virginia level of analysis on minority-owned businesses. Data Dashboard: The dashboard provides a summary of the report findings, interactive data charts, and more detailed information than that found in the report, including jurisdiction level data. ​ The dashboard will be updated on a quarterly basis by the Northern Virginia Regional Commission. Timeline of updates are found on the data dashboard. View Report and Data Dashboard Latest version released: June 8, 2022 Paycheck Protection Program Small Business Loans Small businesses have been hard hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. The Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) was a small business loan program enacted by Congress for relief from the COVID-19 pandemic's economic fallout. Loans were distributed from April 3, 2020 through August 8, 2020. Nationally it provided $525 billion in forgivable loans for firms to cover payroll and some operational costs. The PPP Loans Dashboard contains a report summarizing how Northern Virginia businesses, localities, and industries fared with the loan program. The analysis utilizes the PPP loan database released on December 2, 2020 by the Small Business Administration. Click on image to go to dashboard

  • Education of Towns | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Education of Towns About the Towns Data There are 14 incorporated towns in Northern Virginia. For comparative purposes, Northern Virginia counties and cities, Commonwealth of Virginia, and United States data are provided in the graphs. About the Data and Proper Data Interpretation The education data of incorporated towns is sourced from the U.S. Census Bureau 2000 Census and the American Community Survey (ACS). All of the incorporated towns in Northern Virginia have a population of less than 65,000 persons. One-year ACS estimates do not exist for incorporated places with a population of less than 65,000. All incorporated towns and places in the United States are included in the five-year ACS estimates. ​ It is important to note that any data sourced from the ACS is based on a small sample of the population of a place. The ACS estimates for places with smaller populations such as Clifton, Dumfries, Hamilton, Haymarket, Hillsboro, Lovettsville, Middleburg, and Quantico can be unreliable if the margin of error is large. ​ Only data variables that are deemed relatively reliable have data provided at the town level. For instance, poverty data is unreliable for many towns in Northern Virginia so that data is not being provided. ​ Educational Attainment

  • 2020 Census | NOVADashboard | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    2020 Census Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Analysis of 2020 Decennial Census NVRC Regional Data Analysis and Analysis Timeline Northern Virginia Regional Commission plans to do extensive data analysis of the region. Results of the data analyses will be posted on this NOVA Region Dashboard are currently posted under the People section. A Hou sing section will soon be added to the dashboard to assess the 2020 Census Results and trends. NVRC's regional analyses utilizing the results of the 2020 Census Demographic Profile and Demographic and Housing Characteristics released by the U.S. Census Bureau in May 2023 will be occur during the 2nd-half of 2023 and will continue into 2024. Note, the 2020 Decennial Census does not provide characteristics on education and economics. ​ Census Bureau Nationwide Data Analysis The Census Bureau is continually publishing 2020 Census analyses through a series of data visualizations , America Counts stories , and videos to help illustrate and explain the Census results and the country's demograph ic characteristics. Access Data and Data Release Timeline The 2020 Decennial Census is being released in multiple phases through multiple products. The Demographic Profile, Demographic and Housing Characteristics, and redistricting data all are injected with random statistical “noise” using the differential privacy approach to prevent disclosure of personal information. Caution should be utilized when using this data. The larger the population size of a geographic area, the more accurate the data and the diminished likelihood of having implausible data with the 2020 Census. The 2020 Census has statistical noise infused to protect confidentiality. The impact of statistical noise decreases with larger geographies. For more information, on the statistic noise injected, privacy, and accuracy, see the information under Privacy and Accuracy of 2020 Census Data . ​ Demographic Profile and Demographic and Housing Characteristics - Released May 2023 The 2020 Census Demographic Profile and Demographic and Housing Characteristics were released. These files contain 2020 Census data on characteristics of the population (i.e. age, sex race), characteristics of households (i.e. household size, rent/own, families). ​ Access and view Northern Virginia regional data: ​ ​County/City County/City Demographic Profile County/City Demographic and Housing Characteristics ​ Incorporated Towns Incorporated Towns Demographic Profile Incorporated Town Demographic and Housing Characteristics ​ ​ Redistricting Demographic Data - Released August and September 2021 Redistricting dem ographic data released to the public. This release contains population, race/ethnicity, age, housing units, and housing tenure data for c ounties, cities, and geographies as small as census blocks. The second product set will contain more detail demographic and housing characteristics data. ​ Access and view Northern Virginia regional data: ​ ​County/City County/City Redistricting Data ​ Incorporated Towns Not Available ​ ​ ​ Detailed Demographic and Housing Characteristics DHC-A - Released September 2023 The Detailed Demographic and Housing Characteristics file will be released in three phases, with the first one being the Detailed DHC-A scheduled for September 2023. Included in this release will be detailed population counts, sex, and age for approximately 370 racial and ethnic groups and places of origin, such as German, Lebanese, Chinese, and Mexican. ​ Detailed Demographic and Housing Characteristics DHC-B - Upcoming Release September 2024 The final Detailed Demographic and Housing Characteristics files to be released are the Detailed DHC-B and the Supplemental DHC (S-DHC). The Detailed DHC-B will include detailed household type (e.g., family or non-famil y) and tenure for approximately 370 racial and ethnic groups and places of origin , such as German, Lebanese, Chinese, and Mexican. The Supplemental DHC will include complex relationships between the characteristics about households and the people living in them, including average household size, average household size by age and tenure, and household and family type for people under 18 years old. Privacy and Accuracy of 2020 Census Data The Demographic Profile, Demographic and Housing Characteristics, and redistricting data all are injected with random statistical “noise” using the differential privacy approach to prevent disclosure of personal information. For the Demographic and Housing Characteristics, the Census Bureau released statistical error metrics (Excel File) to help users understand the variation in the data introduced by using differential privacy. Additional guidance to users is provided by the U.S. Census Bureau in the blog post, What to Expect: Disclosure Avoidance and the 2020 Census Demographic and Housing Characteristics File . ​ For decades, the U.S. Census Bureau has used different techniques to protect individual privacy through their Disclosure Avoidance System (DAS). Differential Privacy (DP) is the latest technique. This technique was chosen because enhanced privacy protection is needed due to advances in technology that enable the ability to identify individuals when combined with other information. DP impacts data accuracy more than any other technique previously applied to decennial census results. DP will add random data (“noise”) to counts for geographic areas below the state level, to prevent identification of individuals. The amount of noise added to the data will be greater than any prior decennial census technique. The impact of statistical noise decreases the larger the population size of a geographic area. ​ From 2019 through 2022, Northern Virginia jurisdictions, through the Northern Virginia Regional Commission (NVRC), participated in the U.S. Census Bureau’s DP demonstration data review and provided feedback to the U.S. Census Bureau. The following document is a brief overview of DP and the impacts it has on data quality. Click on the image to download. For an in-depth description of DP go to the Census Bureau's DP website . Download a copy of the Differential Privacy Fact Sheet Privacy Accuracy

  • Accessibility Statement | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Accessibility Statement Overview Date of last revision: 03/04/21 ​ The Northern Virginia Regional Commission strives to ensure that its services are accessible to people with disabilities and has invested resources to help provide an easy-to-use experience for all visitors to our website, novaregiondashboard.com, regardless of the type of device used and whether a visitor uses assistive technology like a screen reader, font magnification, translation or voice recognition software. The Northern Virginia Regional Commission uses the UserWay Website Accessibility Widget powered by a dedicated accessibility server to improve its compliance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.1). The Northern Virginia Regional Commission accessibility menu can be enabled by clicking the accessibility menu icon that appears on the corner of the page. After triggering the accessibility menu, please wait a moment for the accessibility menu to load. The Northern Virginia Regional Commission is committed to constantly improving the accessibility of its site. Despite efforts to make all pages and content on NOVA Region Dashboard fully accessible, some content may not have yet been adapted to the strictest accessibility standards as we identify appropriate technological solutions. ​ If you are having trouble accessing content on NOVA Region Dashboard or require assistance, please do not hesitate to contact us . Browser Accessibility Information Many popular browsers contain built-in accessibility tools. Internet Explorer Accessibility Information Firefox Accessibility Information Chrome Accessibility Information Additional Plug-ins Adobe Reader is required to view and print PDF documents that appear on this website. To download this program for free, visit the Adobe website . To read PDF documents with a screen reader, please visit the Adobe Reader Accessibility website which provides useful tools and resources.

  • Immigration Study Healthcare | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Healthcare Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Healthcare Access to healthcare and medical services is critical for well-being A healthy population and a healthy workforce are essential to a thriving community regardless of immigration status. To overcome this pandemic, it is vital that communities look at creative ways to ensure that everyone stays safe and healthy. 2014 to 2018 Five-Year Estimates Key Facts: ​ The foreign born make up a significant share of those lacking health insurance. Approximately 1 out of 5 foreign born persons are uninsured in Northern Virginia, which is significantly higher than the U.S. born population uninsured rate. Approximately 1 out of 20 U.S. born are uninsured.​ Foreign born make up almost 65 percent of all uninsured in Northern Virginia, while the overall foreign born population is 27.6 percent. The foreign born are clearly disproportionately burdened. ​ Central American countries and Mexico, which are generally Hispanic, make up the largest share of the foreign born population without insurance in Northern Virginia.

  • People Foreign Born Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Foreign Born and Immigrants Overall Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Foreign Born Population Overall The Washington, D.C. metropolitan area is one of the most diverse in the country when taking into consideration the minority and foreign born (immigrant) population make-up. Northern Virginia contains a sizable amount of the metropolitan area's diverse population. The foreign born or immigrant population is transforming the region. Note, the terms foreign born and immigrant are used interchangeably throughout the NOVA Region Dashboard. It is immigration that has been driving many of the major demographic trends in the region , including: School enrollment changes Sizable increases in the number of Hispanics and Asians Population growth Employment growth ​ About the Data and Proper Data Interpretation Foreign born population data is sourced from the U.S. Census Bureau 2000 Census and the American Community Survey (ACS). ​It is important to note that any data sourced from the ACS is based on a small sample of the population of a place. Areas with smaller populations, such as the cities of Northern Virginia, may have a larger margin of error in the data due to the survey sample size being small. This is less of an issue the larger the population. The margin of error is shown in the popup that is displayed when hovering over a bar in the bar charts. If there is a large increase or decrease in the estimate from one time period to the next, and the margin of error is large and overlaps other periods, then the large change between time periods is likely due to statistical sampling error and is not considered statistically significant. In addition to the margin of error, the accuracy of the American Community Survey data for an area can be gaged by evaluating the trend. If the data has a clear trend then the data from one period to the next can be deemed reliable. Foreign Born Population - Current Foreign Born Population Share - Current Five-Year Estimates All jurisdictions in the United States are included in the five-year American Community Survey estimates. The share of the population that is foreign born, for all jurisdictions in Northern Virginia, is displayed in this graph. Northern Virginia's foreign born population share is 27.7%. All Northern Virginia jurisdiction's have a foreign born population share that is greater than the Commonwealth of Virginia and the United States. Out of all 3,144 jurisdictions in the USA, all Northern Virginia jurisdictions are ranked #174 or higher. The region's highest ranked are Manassas Park City (7th), Fairfax County (26th), and Fairfax City (31st), each of which have a greater foreign born population share than New York County, New York (Manhattan) (28.5% and 32nd). Back in 2000, all jurisdictions in Northern Virginia had a foreign born population share that was less than Manhattan. These high ranks of the region's jurisdictions are indicative of a transforming region and the diverse population of Northern Virginia and the DC metropolitan area. Foreign Born Population Share - Current One-Year Estimates Those jurisdictions with a population of 65,000 or more are included in the one-year American Community Survey estimates. The share of the population that is foreign born, for all jurisdictions in Northern Virginia, is displayed in this graph. All Northern Virginia jurisdiction's have a foreign born population share that is greater than the Commonwealth of Virginia and the United States. Out of the 837 jurisdictions with a population of 65,000 or more in the USA, all are ranked #67 or higher, with the region's highest ranked, large jurisdiction being Fairfax County, ranked 18th with a foreign born population of 30.7%. Fairfax County has a greater foreign born population share than New York County, New York (Manhattan) (28.6% and 24th) and Orange County, California (30.2% at 19th). Northern Virginia's foreign born population share is 27.6%, which is only 1.0% less than Manhattan. Back in 2000, all jurisdictions in Northern Virginia had a foreign born population share that was less than Manhattan. These high and changing ranks for the region's jurisdictions are indicative of the very diverse population and a transforming region of Northern Virginia and the DC metropolitan area. Foreign Born Population - Historic Compared to Current Foreign Born Population Share - Historic Compared to Current Five-Year Estimates Immigration has been driving many of the major demographic trends in the region. The foreign born population is transforming the region. Northern Virginia's population was 21.4% foreign born in 2000 and has risen to 27.7% currently. Similar to today, back in 2000 all Northern Virginia jurisdictions had a foreign born population share that was greater than the Commonwealth of Virginia and the United States. The greatest transformations have occurred in the four outer-core jurisdictions of Loudoun, Manassas City, Manassas Park, and Prince William. The outer-core of the region accounts for a majority of the region's overall population growth, as indicated in the population growth charts . Foreign Born Population Share - Historic Compared to Current One-Year Estimates The foreign born population trend, for the regions large jurisdictions (population of 65,000 or more), is shown in the following graphs. The legal status of non-citizens is unknown and not collected by the U.S. Census Bureau in any of its data sets. Key Facts: ​ Northern Virginia, as defined for this analysis using the region's five largest jurisdictions, experienced an increase from 2011 to 2017. The foreign born population share increased from 25.5% to 28.6% respectively. From 2017 to 2021 it trended down, reaching a low of 27.2% in 2021. The decline from 2017 to 2021 was a result of the 2016 to 2020 presidential administration's reforms to immigration policy, as well as the coronavirus pandemic which led to a drop in the region's population between 2020 and 2021 caused by out-migration of residents, higher death rates than normal times, and slowing immigration. In 2022 the pandemic was subsiding and immigration rebounded in the country, which led to higher population growth for immigrants in Northern Virginia compared to the previous year. This higher growth increased Northern Virginia's foreign born population share. ​ Between 2017 and 2022 the region's naturalized citizen population increased. The decrease in the overall foreign-born population can largely be attributed to the non-citizen populations migrating out of the area in greater amounts than naturalized citizens moving into the area. ​ Loudoun and Prince William Counties have had significant increases and trended upward in their foreign born population as a share of the total population since 2010. Note, from 2021 to 2022 Prince William appears to have declined, but this may be a statistical anomaly due to the small sample size of the American Community Survey, the increase regionally and nationally, and the fact that the county's 2022 figure is not a statistically significant difference from 2021 based on the margin of error. When the 2023 data is released, the county trend together with the national and regional trend can confirm whether or not this was an anomaly. ​ Fairfax County's foreign born population share trended up from 2010 to 2017 to a high of 32.1%. From 2017 to 2021 it trended down, reaching a low of 29.9% in 2021. The increase from 2021 to 2022 coincides with the regional and national rebound in immigration. Alexandria and Arlington's foreign born populations have dropped since 2017 or 2018 and have not begun to rebound since the peak of the pandemic, unlike the region overall. ​​

  • Coronavirus Vulnerable Populations | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Coronavirus Vulnerable Populations Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Social Vulnerability The U.S. Center for Disease Control's (CDC) 2018 Social Vulnerability Index (SVI) indicates the relative social vulnerability of every Virginia census tract. Social vulnerability is a measure of an area's resilience when confronted by disease outbreaks like the coronavirus (COVID-19) and stress on human nature such as natural or man-made disasters. The SVI can be used by governments and non-government entities to identify communities that may need support. Click on image to go to dashboard Senior Population The senior population has been one of the most vulnerable population in the coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic. The senior population data and maps are a resource for government and non-government entities to identify communities in Virginia and the Northern Virginia region that may need support. Click on image to go to dashboard Immigrant Population The Immigration Study Dashboard provides a report published on October 21, 2020 that details the role of immigrants in Northern Virginia during the Covid-19 pandemic as well as the impact that the pandemic has had on the immigrant community. ​​ The immigrant population is especially vulnerable to gaps in our social safety nets. Understanding this population in Northern Virginia helps better inform local leaders as they aim to implement inclusive emergency response policies. Click on image to download a copy of the report

  • Economics of Towns | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Economics of Towns About the Towns Economics Data There are 14 incorporated towns in Northern Virginia. For comparative purposes, Northern Virginia counties and cities, Commonwealth of Virginia, and United States data are provided in the graphs. About the Data and Proper Data Interpretation The economic data of incorporated towns is sourced from the 2000 Census and the American Community Survey (ACS). All of the incorporated towns in N orthern Virginia have a population of less than 65,000 persons. One-year ACS estimates do not exist for incorporated places with a population of less than 65,000. All incorporated towns and places in the United States are included in the five-year ACS estimates. ​ It is important to note that any data sourced from the ACS is based on a small sample of the population of a place. The ACS estimates for places with smaller populations such as Clifton, Dumfries, Hamilton, Haymarket, Hillsboro, Lovettsville, Middleburg, and Quantico can be unreliable if the margin of error is large. A town's margin of area for an ACS data piece can be found by hovering over the town's data in a graph. If there is a large increase or decrease in the estimate from one time period to the next, and the margin of error is large and overlaps other periods, then the large change between time periods is likely due to statistical sampling error and is not considered statistically significant. In addition to the margin of error, the accuracy of the American Community Survey data for an area can be gaged by evaluating the trend. If the data has a clear trend then the data from one period to the next can be deemed reliable. ​ Only data variables that are deemed relatively reliable have data provided at the town level. For instance, poverty data is unreliable for many towns in Northern Virginia so that data is not being provided. Median Household Income

  • Immigration Study | NOVA Region Dashboard| Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Immigration Study Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. The Northern Virginia Regional Commission was pleased to collaborate with the Partnership for a New American Economy (NAE) and the Community Foundation for Northern Virginia on the study, One Region: Welcoming New Americans to Northern Virginia. ​ The original study was published on March 12, 2020. It is a study of the economic impact of immigrants to the region. An addendum to the study was published on October 21, 2020 that provides immigrant data relevant to the COVID-19 pandemic crisis response . The research was conducted by NAE. NAE has undertaken similar studies throughout the United States.​ ​ This One Region report dashboard summarizes and reports on immigration in the Northern Virginia region. This dashboard provides quick access to key data pieces found in the report. This One Region immigration dashboard provides data not only of the overall Northern Virginia region, but also on the localities within the region . ​ A webinar was hosted on October 21, 2020. For copies of the presentations and video recording go to the webinar webpage. Download a copy of the original report, published March 2020 Overview of the One Region Report The One Region report is a comprehensive picture of new Americans in Northern Virginia (NOVA). It highlights the size and rapid growth in the immigrant population in the region and their impact on the local economy, including injecting more money into local businesses, property markets, and municipal budgets as consumers, homebuyers, and taxpayers. ​ Immigrants are major contributors to Northern Virginia's (NOVA) economy as highlighted in the report. The NOVA immigrant population is diverse. These people emigrate, seeking a better life for themselves and their families. “Immigrants are a vital part of the economic and social fabric of Northern Virginia. Their success is our success, and we must continue to be a welcoming community for all to ensure our long-term prosperity,” said P. David Tarter, Chairman of the Northern Virginia Regional Commission and Mayor of the City of Falls Church. Immigrants are an indispensable part of the local Northern Virginia economy at all levels, as workers, business owners, taxpayers and consumers. Trivia: What is the foreign born share of the population in NOVA? Source: U.S Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey, 5-Year Estimates. 27.6% Immigrants widen and deepen the labor market with a vast array of skills and levels of expertise. They help businesses, farms, and factories fill workforce gaps at all levels of the labor market, allowing companies to meet market demands and expand their operations, which leads to more job creation. ​ * Except where otherwise noted, the term “immigrant” and “foreign-born” are used interchangeably throughout the NOVA Region Dashboard and in the "One Region" report. COVID-19 Addendum One Region Report Addendum on COVID-19 Response ​This brief provides a glimpse at the role of immigrants in Northern Virginia during the Covid-19 pandemic as well as the impact that the pandemic has had on the immigrant community. ​ The immigrant population is especially vulnerable to gaps in our social safety nets. Understanding this population in Northern Virginia helps better inform local leaders as they aim to implement inclusive emergency response policies. The immigrant population is essential to our country’s rapid COVID-19 response efforts. Download a copy of the COVID-19 addendum report published October 2020 Data Charts and Key Findings by Report Topic (best viewed on desktop) The data is sourced from the U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey (ACS) five-year estimates, as well as other sources. The ACS is a survey based on a sample of the population. Sample surveys include a degree of uncertainty and error in the data. The larger the population and housing units of an area or data variable, the more reliable the ACS data. The Northern Virginia regional data is more reliable than the county level data that is presented in the data charts. Users should interpret the data by keeping this in mind. Citizenship Entrepreneurship Internet Access Economy Healthcare Language Spoken Education Housing Labor Force Additional Immigrant Information (best viewed on desktop) Further information about Northern Virginia's immigrant population, from research NVRC has conducted separately from the One Region report, can be found on the People dashboard. People There is a myriad of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) that provide services to immigrants. A number of the local governments in Northern Virginia also provide links to information and services. Where to Get Help

bottom of page